Crop rotation in a home garden, regardless of the size, should be done every year. The reasons why:

Disease Prevention: The main reason to rotate crops is to prevent the spread of plant disease.  Disease organisms can build up over time, resulting in eventual crop failure. Rotating crops keeps these organisms in check.

Insect Control: Crop rotation also helps reduce insect infestations.

Nutrient Needs: Different families of plants require different nutrients. By rotating your crops, you keep the soil from being depleted and can target soil amendments to keep your garden balanced.

Soil enrichment: Some plants actually enhance the soil, so rotating them through the garden can produce free organic soil conditioning.

Crop rotation involves dividing the garden into sections, and planting a different plant family in each section every year. A routine rotating schedule ensures that every section eventually receives a different crop. To keep crop rotation simple, use the chart below.

 

YEAR
ONE

Lettuce
index clip image002 0000

Fruit
index clip image004 0000

Root crops
index clip image006 0000

Beans/Peas
index clip image008 0000

 

YEAR
TWO

Fruit
index clip image009 0001

Root crops
index clip image006 0000

Beans/Peas
index clip image008 0000

Lettuce
index clip image002 0000

 

YEAR
THREE

Root crops
index clip image006 0000

Beans/Peas
index clip image008 0000

Lettuce
index clip image002 0000

Fruit
index clip image009 0001

 

YEAR
FOUR

Beans/Peas
index clip image008 0000

Lettuce
index clip image002 0000

Fruit
index clip image009 0001

Root crops
index clip image006 0000

The information presented here was current at the time of publication. Product labels change from time to time, so please remember to read and follow all label directions. Products referred to here may not be registered in all states. Dealers, please check with Bonide before offering for sale, or recommending for use.

The following have been used for reference, and are good sources of additional information: The University of TN Institute of Agriculture, The University of MD Cooperative Extension, Purdue University, The University of KY Cooperative Extension, The Cornell Cooperative Extension, The LSU Ag Center, The IFAS Extension.